FSUCML in the News

Bright spots could be key to securing the future of declining coral reefs


In recent decades, the decline of living hard coral on reefs around the world has raised concerns among marine experts. For years, the presumption was that decline signaled that an entire reef’s future was threatened. A study by Florida State University researchers shows that might not always be the case. While a complement of healthy coral is still preferred, dead or dying coral might not be fatal for an entire reef.

Loggerhead Sea Turtles Host Diverse Community of Miniature Organisms


There is a world of life on the backs of loggerhead sea turtles, and it’s more abundant and diverse than scientists knew. An international team led by Florida State University researchers found that more than double the number of organisms than previously observed live on the shells of these oceanic reptiles, raising important questions about loggerhead sea turtle ecology and conservation.

New Book Co-Authored by Dr. Grubbs Sets Release Date


FSUCML's Dr. Dean Grubbs co-authored a book with Dr. Daniel Abel from Coastal Carolina University. The book is set to Sept. 2020, is titled " Shark Biology and Conservation: Essential Information for Enthusiasts, Educators, Naturalists and Students" -(And anyone else fascinated by these magnificent beasts). Elise Pullen, MSc, also from Coastal Carolina University, created the scientific illustrations for the book with Marc Dando.

10 Years Later - FSU Experts Available to Comment on Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill


Ten years ago, an estimated 200 million gallons of oil flowed into the Gulf of Mexico from a damaged well below the Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling rig. Scientists and first responders scrambled to predict where the released oil would go and how it would affect the circulation, ecology and biogeochemistry of the Gulf. FSU researchers, including FSUCML's own Dr. Grubbs, were at the forefront of that effort, attracting millions in research dollars to conduct thorough investigations into the crisis and its aftermath.

Atlantic Goliath Grouper: To Fish or Not to Fish


Read the recent Fisheries article by Koenig, Coleman, & Malinowski about the drawbacks of re-establishing a fishery for the threatened Atlantic Goliath Grouper, including: the loss of nursery habitat, increasingly destructive episodic red tide and cold snap events that decimate juvenile populations, and the effects of mercury contamination on survival. Add to this the human health risk of consuming these mercury-contaminated fishes, and the argument supporting the fishery evaporates.